HOW TO COOK FOOD PROPERLY


Salad is arranging a competition on: “ how to boil potatoes”? If anyone boils or explains how s/he boil potatoes, if it is correct gets a big praise.     

Healthy cooking doesn’t mean that you have to pay outrageous amounts of money for a gourmet chef or those overly priced cooking utensils, or even those expensive cookbooks. Healthy cooking also doesn’t mean that you have to cut out all of the foods that you love to eat. Essentially, many foods are very healthy. What makes them unhealthy is how people prepare and cook them. Preparing meals healthfully means that you are able to eat all of the food that you like to eat without having to feel like you are ruining your dieting plan or your health.  Cooking healthfully can be done very easily at home. You don’t even need to waste time finding a recipe! Here are some tips that can help you turn your meals into healthy, wholesome food or everyone.

Techniques for Healthy Cooking

Despite what you may think, cooking methods aren’t created equal. A food can be filled with all of the essential vitamins and nutrients before it is cooked, but after it is cooked the wrong way, all of the nutrients disappear. The question stands, how can you cook delicious food while keeping all of the essential vitamins and nutrients in the food?

There are many ways that you can cook your favourite foods in a healthy manner. These methods will allow you to keep all of the natural nutrients and flavours of the food without adding salt or unnecessary fats.

One way to cook food in a healthy way is Asian stir-fry. With stir-fry, small pieces of food are cooked in a large wok or a non-stick frying pan. If you use a wok, you might need to use a little bit of cooking spray because you will be constantly tossing the food, so you want to make sure that it is not sticking to the pan and causing you any sort of hassle. This works perfectly, especially if you are cooking a meal that includes noodles, rice, vegetables, and small pieces of meat.

Many times when people cook vegetables, especially Americans, they lose the nutrients that they have because salt and butter is added. When a vegetable is cooked the right way, there is hardly any need to cover up the taste with salt and fat.

Another great way to cook healthily is to use a roasting pan when cooking meat. When you use a roasting pan, all of the fat is able to drip off of the food while cooking. This way, your meat isn’t soaking in all of its fats and juices while you cook it. If you want to find a way to keep your meat tasty and full of flavour, baste it with wine or lemon juice instead of using its own drippings.

If you use these tips in the kitchen, you are sure to be on your way to a healthy cooking lifestyle that you will enjoy.

 


WHAT IS GOING ON?




LET US HAVE SOMETHING TO EAT




HOW SAFE IS YOUR FOOD....?


HOW SAFE IS YOUR FOOD DURING HOT SUMMER?

Follow these tips to reduce the risk of food poisoning at home:

1. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and hot water and dry them before handling food and after handling raw meat, going to the toilet, blowing your nose or touching animals (including pets).

2. Wash worktops before and after preparing food, particularly after they've been touched by raw meat, including poultry or raw eggs. You don’t need to use anti-bacterial sprays. Hot soapy water is fine.

3. Wash dishcloths and tea towels regularly and let them dry before you use them again. Dirty, damp cloths are the perfect place for bacteria to breed.

4. Use separate chopping boards for raw meat and for ready-to-eat food. Raw meat contains harmful bacteria that can spread very easily to anything it touches, including other foods, worktops, chopping boards and knives.

5. It's especially important to keep raw meat away from ready-to-eat foods such as salad, fruit and bread. This is because these foods won't be cooked before you eat them, so any bacteria that gets on to the foods won't be killed.

6. Always cover raw meat and store it on the bottom shelf of the fridge where it can't touch other foods or drip on to them.

7. Cook food thoroughly and check that it’s piping hot all the way through. Make sure poultry, pork, burgers, sausages and kebabs are cooked until steaming hot, with no pink meat inside.

8. Keep your fridge temperature between 0C and 5C. By keeping food cold, you stop food poisoning bugs growing.

9. If you have cooked food that you're not going to eat straight away, cool it as quickly as possible (within 90 minutes) and store it in the fridge or freezer. Use any leftovers from the fridge within two days.

10. Don’t eat food that's past its "use by" date label. These are based on scientific tests that show how quickly harmful bugs can develop in the packaged food.

 





Eight extraordinary uses for bicarbonate of soda

1. Cleaning

First and foremost, bicarb is fantastic for clearning. Soak tea or coffee stained mugs with bicarb dissolved in water overnight and they’ll come out squeaky clean. A bicarb solution will remove scuff marks on laminate floors or skirting boards with a bit of gentle wiping. Add a little water to bicarb to make a paste and use this to polish your silver for a brilliant shine.

You can also dip half a potato in a bicarb solution and then use it to rub away rust on cutlery, or anything else metal.
2. Removing bad smells

An open tub of bicarb in your fridge will rid it of that gone-off food smell that seems to linger even though you’ve thrown out everything that’s past its sell-by date.

You can also get rid of garlic (or generally bad) breath by gargling with a teaspoon of bicarb dissolved in a glass of water.

Use a powder puff to dab some bicarb under your arms for an effective deodorant. It won’t make you smell of roses, but you won’t smell bad either. A small bag filled with bicarb and put in your wardrobe will also stop your clothes smelling musty.
3. Soothing skin

A bicarbonate of soda solution dabbed onto a minor burn until it has cooled will soothe it and help it heal. If you’ve been bitten by a mosquito or any other insect, a paste of bicarbonate of soda will help sooth the bite and dry it out so it heals quicker.
4. Freshen up

If you want to freshen up your whites a scoop of bicarb in your white wash will have them dazzling in no time. As well as invigorating your clothes, a bit of bicarb in the water for your cut flowers will help keep them perky for longer and boost alkaline loving potted plants.
5. Make your own honeycomb

Less practical, but lots of fun, you can use bicarbonate of soda to make your own crunchies.

Heat gently two tablespoons of golden syrup in a saucepan with five tablespoons of granulated sugar. When the sugar has dissolved bring the mixture to the boil and leave until it turns golden brown. Whisk in the bicarb (this will make the mixture foam) and quickly pour onto an oiled baking sheet. Leave to cool and then break up for shards of yummy honeycomb.
6. Launch your own rocket

Pour 25mls of malt vinegar into a plastic bottle. Place a tissue over the neck of the bottle and push down slightly to make a well. Pour three teaspoons of bicarbonate into the tissue well and screw the bottle cap on loosely. Turn the bottle upside down and place on a flat surface very quickly. As the vinegar reacts with the bicarb the bottle will shoot into the air. Be careful though - make sure you stand well back! See how to do it here.
7. Tenderising meat

Fed up with bashing out your meat with a little hammer to get it tender? Instead, pour bicarb over it and then leave to work its magic in the fridge for 3-5 hours. Once you’re ready to cook, rinse off thoroughly and your meat will be beautifully tender.
8. Fire safety

In case your kitchen is short of a fire-safety blanket, when poured over a grease or oil fire, bicarbonate of soda can extinguish flames. Although it wouldn’t be safe to rely on this in an emergency!
Disadvantages of using BICARBONATE OF SODA

Although I do not class baking soda as a drug, it can have side effects and interactions with drugs you may be taking. You must not start taking baking soda without consulting your doctor. Significantly, as a salt of sodium (baking soda is also called bicarbonate of soda or sodium bicarbonate) it can raise blood pressure. Possible side effects include
• Appetite loss
• Breathing slow
• Continuing headache
• Feet or lower legs swollen
• Mood changes
• Restlessness or nervousness
• Twitching or painful muscles
• Unpleasant taste
• Urge to urinate frequently
• Vomiting or nausea


Eight extraordinary uses for bicarbonate of soda

1. Cleaning

First and foremost, bicarb is fantastic for clearning. Soak tea or coffee stained mugs with bicarb dissolved in water overnight and they’ll come out squeaky clean. A bicarb solution will remove scuff marks on laminate floors or skirting boards with a bit of gentle wiping. Add a little water to bicarb to make a paste and use this to polish your silver for a brilliant shine.

You can also dip half a potato in a bicarb solution and then use it to rub away rust on cutlery, or anything else metal.
2. Removing bad smells

An open tub of bicarb in your fridge will rid it of that gone-off food smell that seems to linger even though you’ve thrown out everything that’s past its sell-by date.

You can also get rid of garlic (or generally bad) breath by gargling with a teaspoon of bicarb dissolved in a glass of water.

Use a powder puff to dab some bicarb under your arms for an effective deodorant. It won’t make you smell of roses, but you won’t smell bad either. A small bag filled with bicarb and put in your wardrobe will also stop your clothes smelling musty.
3. Soothing skin

A bicarbonate of soda solution dabbed onto a minor burn until it has cooled will soothe it and help it heal. If you’ve been bitten by a mosquito or any other insect, a paste of bicarbonate of soda will help sooth the bite and dry it out so it heals quicker.
4. Freshen up

If you want to freshen up your whites a scoop of bicarb in your white wash will have them dazzling in no time. As well as invigorating your clothes, a bit of bicarb in the water for your cut flowers will help keep them perky for longer and boost alkaline loving potted plants.
5. Make your own honeycomb

Less practical, but lots of fun, you can use bicarbonate of soda to make your own crunchies.

Heat gently two tablespoons of golden syrup in a saucepan with five tablespoons of granulated sugar. When the sugar has dissolved bring the mixture to the boil and leave until it turns golden brown. Whisk in the bicarb (this will make the mixture foam) and quickly pour onto an oiled baking sheet. Leave to cool and then break up for shards of yummy honeycomb.
6. Launch your own rocket

Pour 25mls of malt vinegar into a plastic bottle. Place a tissue over the neck of the bottle and push down slightly to make a well. Pour three teaspoons of bicarbonate into the tissue well and screw the bottle cap on loosely. Turn the bottle upside down and place on a flat surface very quickly. As the vinegar reacts with the bicarb the bottle will shoot into the air. Be careful though - make sure you stand well back! See how to do it here.
7. Tenderising meat

Fed up with bashing out your meat with a little hammer to get it tender? Instead, pour bicarb over it and then leave to work its magic in the fridge for 3-5 hours. Once you’re ready to cook, rinse off thoroughly and your meat will be beautifully tender.
8. Fire safety

In case your kitchen is short of a fire-safety blanket, when poured over a grease or oil fire, bicarbonate of soda can extinguish flames. Although it wouldn’t be safe to rely on this in an emergency!
Disadvantages of using BICARBONATE OF SODA

Although I do not class baking soda as a drug, it can have side effects and interactions with drugs you may be taking. You must not start taking baking soda without consulting your doctor. Significantly, as a salt of sodium (baking soda is also called bicarbonate of soda or sodium bicarbonate) it can raise blood pressure. Possible side effects include
• Appetite loss
• Breathing slow
• Continuing headache
• Feet or lower legs swollen
• Mood changes
• Restlessness or nervousness
• Twitching or painful muscles
• Unpleasant taste
• Urge to urinate frequently
• Vomiting or nausea









Return Home