1) Do you know what is the largest organ of your body?

Yes, it is skin.

2) Do you know how to clean your skin?

Do you wash your face?

Do you brush your back? How often?

Do you feed your skin?

Old Public Turkish & Roman bath

The skin is the largest organ of the body, with a total area of about 20 square feet. The skin protects us from microbes and the elements, helps regulate body temperature, and permits the sensations of touch, heat, and cold.

Skin has three layers:

1)    The epidermis, the outermost layer of skin, provides a waterproof barrier and creates our skin tone.

2)    The dermis, beneath the epidermis, contains tough connective tissue, hair follicles, and sweat glands.

3)    The deeper subcutaneous tissue (hypodermis) is made of fat and connective tissue.

The skin’s color is created by special cells called melanocytes, which produce the pigment melanin. Melanocytes are located in the epidermis.

Skin Conditions

  • Rash: Nearly any change in the skin’s appearance can be called a rash. Most rashes are from simple skin irritation; others result from medical conditions. 
  • Dermatitis: A general term for inflammation of the skin. Atopic dermatitis (a type of eczema) is the most common form. 
  • Eczema: Skin inflammation (dermatitis) causing an itchy rash. Most often, it’s due to an overactive immune system. 
  • Psoriasis: An autoimmune condition that can cause a variety of skin rashes. Silver, scaly plaques on the skin are the most common form. 
  • Dandruff: A scaly condition of the scalp may be caused by seborrheic dermatitis, psoriasis, or eczema. 
  • Acne: The most common skin condition, acne affects over 85% of people at some time in life. 
  • Cellulitis: Inflammation of the dermis and subcutaneous tissues, usually due to an infection. A red, warm, often painful skin rash generally results. 
  • Skin abscess (boil or furuncle): A localized skin infection creates a collection of pus under the skin. Some abscesses must be opened and drained by a doctor in order to be cured. 
  • Rosacea: A chronic skin condition causing a red rash on the face. Rosacea may look like acne, and is poorly understood. 
  • Warts: A virus infects the skin and causes the skin to grow excessively, creating a wart. Warts may be treated at home with chemicals, duct tape, or freezing, or removed by a physician. 
  • Melanoma: The most dangerous type of skin cancer, melanoma results from sun damage and other causes. A skin biopsy can identify melanoma. 
  • Basal cell carcinoma: The most common type of skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma is less dangerous than melanoma because it grows and spreads more slowly. 
  • Seborrheic keratosis: A benign, often itchy growth that appears like a “stuck-on” wart. Seborrheic keratoses may be removed by a physician, if bothersome. 
  • Actinic keratosis: A crusty or scaly bump that forms on sun-exposed skin. Actinic keratoses can sometimes progress to cancer. 
  • Squamous cell carcinoma: A common form of skin cancer, squamous cell carcinoma may begin as an ulcer that won’t heal, or an abnormal growth. It usually develops in sun-exposed areas. 
  • Herpes: The herpes viruses HSV-1 and HSV-2 can cause periodic blisters  or skin irritation around the lips or the genitals. 
  • Hives: Raised, red, itchy patches on the skin that arise suddenly. Hives usually result from an allergic reaction. 
  • Tinea versicolor: A benign fungal skin infection creates pale areas of low pigmentation on the skin.

  • Viral exantham: Many viral infections can cause a red rash affecting large areas of the skin. This is especially common in children. 
  • Shingles (herpes zoster): Caused by the chickenpox virus, shingles is a painful rash on one side of the body. A new adult vaccine can prevent shingles in most people. 
  • Scabies: Tiny mites that burrow into the skin cause scabies. An intensely itchy rash in the webs of fingers, wrists, elbows, and buttocks is typical of scabies. 
  • Ringworm: A fungal skin infection (also called tinea). The characteristic rings it creates are not due to worms.

Further Reading:

 WHAT IS FUNGUS?










WHAT IS FUNGUS


WHAT IS FUNGUS

A fungus (pronounced or funguses is a member of a large group of eukaryotic organisms that includes microorganisms such as yeasts and moulds (British English: moulds), as well as the more familiar mushrooms. These organisms are classified as a kingdom, Fungi, which; is separate from plants, animals, and bacteria. One major difference is that fungal cells have cell walls that contain chitin, unlike the cell walls of plants, which contain cellulose. These and other differences show that the fungi form a single group of related organisms, named the Eumycota (true fungi or Eumycetes), that share a common ancestor (a monophyletic group). This fungal group is distinct from the structurally similar myxomycetes (slime moulds) and oomycetes (water moulds). The discipline of biology devoted to the study of fungi is known as mycology, which is often regarded as a branch of botany, even though genetic studies have shown that fungi are more closely related to animals than to plants.
Abundant worldwide, most fungi are inconspicuous because of the small size of their structures, and their cryptic lifestyles in soil, on dead matter, and as symbionts of plants, animals, or other fungi. They may become noticeable when fruiting, either as mushrooms or moulds. Fungi perform an essential role in the decomposition of organic matter and have fundamental roles in nutrient cycling and exchange. They have long been used as a direct source of food, such as mushrooms and truffles, as a leavening agent for bread, and in fermentation of various food products, such as wine, beer, and soy sauce. Since the 1940s, fungi have been used for the production of antibiotics, and, more recently, various enzymes produced by fungi are used industrially and in detergents. Fungi are also used as biological pesticides to control weeds, plant diseases and insect pests. Many species produce bioactive compounds called mycotoxins, such as alkaloids and polyketides, that are toxic to animals including humans. The fruiting structures of a few species contain psychotropic compounds and are consumed recreationally or in traditional spiritual ceremonies. Fungi can break down manufactured materials and buildings, and become significant pathogens of humans and other animals. Losses of crops due to fungal diseases (e.g. rice blast disease) or food spoilage can have a large impact on human food supplies and local economies.
The fungus kingdom encompasses an enormous diversity of taxa with varied ecologies, life cycle strategies, and morphologies ranging from single-celled aquatic chytrids to large mushrooms. However, little is known of the true biodiversity of Kingdom Fungi, which has been estimated at around 1.5 million species, with about 5% of these having been formally classified. Ever since the pioneering 18th and 19th century taxonomical works of Carl Linnaeus, Christian Hendrik Persoon, and Elias Magnus Fries, fungi have been classified according to their morphology (e.g., characteristics such as spore colour or microscopic features) or physiology. Advances in molecular genetics have opened the way for DNA analysis to be incorporated into taxonomy, which has sometimes challenged the historical groupings based on morphology and other traits. Phylogenetic studies published in the last decade have helped reshape the classification of Kingdom Fungi, which is divided into one subkingdom, seven phyla, and ten subphyla.
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